Lake Stevens Rain Barrel Sale and Stillaguamish Waterways Webinar

A rain barrel is a container used to catch rainwater(often from rooftop runoff via pipes), which can be used for watering plants and other outdoor uses. It’s a great way to conserve water while saving money on water bills! Visit the included link to preorder a rain barrel(for $55 plus tax) from the Snohomish Conservation District. They will be available to pick up on November 14th from 10am to 12pm at the Lake Stevens City Hall. Please wear a mask! https://snohomishcd.org/events-workshops/2020/11/14/rain-barrel-sale-in-lake-stevens

Snohomish Conservation District’s Habitat and Floodplains team will also be holding a webinar on November 14th from 3:30-5:00pm about waterways such as rivers, streams, and creeks and the do’s and don’ts of living next to one. This will be very informative for those who live next to a waterway; particularly those who live in the Stillaguamish Watershed. Topics that will be covered in this webinar include water quality, local wildlife, river processes, waterway regulations, and resources like free site visits and financial assistance programs. Visit this link to sign up: https://snohomishcd.org/events-workshops/2020/11/14/streamside-landowner-webinar-stillaguamish-watershed. This webinar will also be posted on their Youtube channel at a later date.

From the Field to Families: The Food Bank Farm

Chinook Farms shares acreage with several partner farms, and ten acres of this area belong to the Food Bank Farm. This farm is run by the Episcopal Church of the Holy Cross in Redmond and they grow a wide variety of foods such as beets, carrots, squash, potatoes, corn, and green beans which are all sent to local food banks. With the help of many volunteers and groups like Food Lifeline(https://foodlifeline.org/), the Food Bank Farm is making a big difference for food banks and families in need. Visit this link to sign up and attend upcoming beet harvests  https://www.signupgenius.com/go/10c0b4ba8a92cabfe3-food. Visit the Food Bank Farm Facebook page for up to date information: https://www.facebook.com/VeggiesforFoodBanks

An acorn squash. Squash is one of the primary crops at the Food Bank Farm and several varieties are cultivated.

A Look At The Skagit Valley Food Co-op

Skagit Valley is famous for its beautiful tulip fields and lovely produce. The Skagit Valley Food Cooperative helps local farmers and vendors in the area by selling organic local produce, cheese, grain, seeds, baked goods, meat, seafood, and more from places like Samish Bay Cheese, Sunseed Farm, Bow Hill Blueberries, and many more. They have a very large variety of produce such as lettuce, potatoes, apples, burdock root, nettle, heirloom tomatoes, herbs, and more. As this is a cooperative business, Skagit Valley Food Co-op is collectively owned and managed by over 13,000 members. They also give back to the community by donating to local organizations like Skagit Animals in Need and Skagit Valley Farmers Market Coalition. This is a great way to support the Skagit community and discover tasty food! Visit their website at http://www.skagitfoodcoop.com/ to find out more.

Volunteer Opportunity: Become a Salmon Watcher

Dr. Jeffery Jensen is an ichthyologist (ichthyology is the study of fish) from University of Washington Bothell and he needs volunteer salmon watchers to help view and work with salmon on streams that flow into the Sammamish River such as Bear, Lyon, Swamp, and North Creek. Dr. Jensen is studying kokanee salmon (a landlocked variation of sockeye salmon) as well as other types of salmon and fish.

If you would like to take part; visit Dr. Jensen’s blog to find all the information needed to sign up: https://jsjensenblog.wordpress.com/north-lake-washington-salmon-sightings/.

And if you ever happen to see a salmon in a local stream, fill out this survey: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScJAJAhW6MqHYtAveCXJAGAwJCwjMM9cZ7vUC7MCd7mNqVP-w/viewform

EastWest Food Rescue

This nonprofit organization’s mission is to purchase surplus food from Northwest farmers (such as Terra Gold Farms who grow potatoes) and distribute it to people in need. These rescued crops that otherwise would’ve gone to waste are helping feed people as well as helping farmers. East West Food Rescue serves over 230 food banks, community kitchens, senior centers, native tribes, school food programs, and many other helping organizations. Visit their website at https://eastwestfoodrescue.org/ to learn more about East West Food Rescue and discover opportunities to help out by becoming a volunteer.

EvCC Offers Free Holiday Tree Recycling Jan 2 through Feb 2 2018

Trees can be dropped off between 7:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. on weekdays.  Trees must be free of decorations, tinsel and other non-biodegradable materials. No flocked trees will be accepted.

EvCC is located at 2000 Tower St. in Everett. Drop off trees in the marked area in parking lot F. To see the location of parking lot F, visit EverettCC.edu/Maps and click Campus Map.

EvCC has been recycling holiday trees since 2009. Last year, EvCC collected approximately more than 250 trees that were turned into woodchips on site and used for campus flower beds and mulch.

For more information, call 425-388-9512.

EvCC Sustainability, College Services Launch New Pilot to Incentivize Alternative Transportation

 

Students boarding a bus at EvCC’s Transit Center

 

New year, new projects. That’s how we look at things here in the EvCC Sustainability program! One of the many new projects underway for this year is a pilot program to incentivize students and employees to use public transportation. Island Transit has reinstated a once discontinued route, the Everett Connector, which runs a single bus from Terrys Corner Park and Ride on Camano Island to the Everett Station, with a stop at Tower and Broadway, right in front of EvCC.

A report put together by EvCC student and Sustainability Staff, Max Tinsley, determined that this route could potentially cut commute time in half for students who live in the North County region, comprised of Stanwood, Camano Island, and the unincorporated areas north of Arlington. The report also outlined that approximately 10% of annual enrollment at EvCC are students living in the North County area.

Similar to the existing ORCA program, students can purchase a buss pass for Island Transit route 412, the Everett Connector, for $45.00 in the Cashiers Office, in Parks Student Union. This is being run as a pilot program for Fall Quarter, with a limited number of passes available to find out the demand for such a program. The passes are valid for the entire quarter, rather than just a month, as they would be if purchased from Island Transit directly.

This project is not only a benefit to the environment, but it can also help to reduce traffic and parking congestion. The outcome of Max Tinsleys effort is also a reminder that one person has the power to bring about significant change and leave a lasting impact on their community, if only they stay engaged and involved in the public process.

EvCC Partners with 3-R Technology to benefit Bangalore Orphanage

“I’m happy to report that our latest shipment of laptops refurbished by 3R Technology just arrived at the Homes of Hope India orphanage in Bangalore. This facility provides housing, meals, and education for over a hundred young women and girls from one of the most disenfranchised and under-served communities in the world. These laptops help ensure much-needed education and training for their academic and employment future.”
Many thanks to you and all our customers for helping us make these donations possible! Your commitment to environmentally sound and ethical electronics recycling makes a tremendous difference…”    

       

 –Glen Giados, the CEO of 3-R Technology,  regarding the more than 5 tons of electronic waste that Everett Community College and local community members have recycled by partnering with 3-R Technology/Recycling  in the past 3 years during EvCC Sustainability recycling events.

 

New Garden at EvCC Represents Indigenous Cultures

Red Columbine, commonly found near streams and mountain meadows

Red Columbine, commonly found near streams and mountain meadows

Over the 2016-17 school year, a group of students have undertaken a project to bring a new sense of indigenous culture to our campus. The 1st Nations Club, co-advised by Brian Ramos from the Workforce Funding Department, has slowly been converting a section of the wooded area in the heart of campus to an Indigenous Garden, putting in native plants such as Red Columbine, Miners Lettuce, and Nootka Rose to name a few.

EvCC has a history of representing indigenous cultures on campus, through the various pieces of art donated to the college by some local tribes. There is a totem pole in the northwest section of campus outside of Olympus Hall, and the Thunderbird Killer Whale sculpture is located on the edge of the site of the new garden.

A student and staff member planting Bleeding Hearts

When asked about the purpose of this project, the students were eager to tell the story. They explained how this garden, to them, represents the success of native people, and how they’ve overcome many challenges to get to where they are today.

“I am this plant, I am of this Earth,” said Erik Sanchez, a student working on the project, “It’s really cool to feel connected.”

The group has finished with the planting, and over time will be adding outdoor furniture to resemble a traditional native gathering area. The project will continue throughout the rest of the school year as well as into the future.

A student adds fertilizer to a planting spot

Erik Sanchez, one of the students working on this garden.